• Gamers
  • Farmers
  • Military

The world of gaming is growing and through it you can make friends from all over the world. Sometimes the chat features on these games can get exciting and aggressive. During the month of September, we are asking that you to use your chat to “check in” before or during the game to make sure your team, opponents and/or friends are doing okay.

Why Check in?

  • In Kansas, death by suicide is the 2nd leading cause of death for ages 15 – 34
  • According to the KCTCdata.org, in 2019, 40% of those reporting self-disclosed that in the past 12 months they have felt sad or hopeless every day for at least two weeks 
  • According to the KCTCdata.org, in 2019, the two top sources a person with mental health concern would go to for help is a partner/significant other and/or a friend

 

What should I do if I see someone posting about suicide or self-harm in chat

  • Engage:For many people in distress, lending a calm, empathic ear can make all the difference
  • Ask Questions:Do not hesitate to seek clarification and ask for specifics when someone wants support
  • Get Help:Know the resources available. If a gamer shows signs of a serious or unremitting problem, urge them to seek professional help

 

Do this on the regular! Encourage your team, party, opponents, or friends to take care of their mental health: 

  •  Take a walk outside
  • Create a playlist of music that makes you happy
  • Take a day off from gaming
  • Plan an outing with a friend

Farm life has unique challenges. The weather, costly repairs, injuries, and other unpleasant surprises can upend even the most careful production plan. This can take a great toll on the mental health of those that love to work on the land and create the food that we enjoy eating. So, during the month of September, we are encouraging all those that work with, provide services for and/or know a farmer to “check in.” 

Why Check in? Death by Suicide is preventable! 

  • Your “check in” may create a positive connection needed to help reduces the risk of suicidal behavior 
  • Your “check in” may help reduce the stigma and be the support needed for them to seek mental health services  
  • Your “check in” may help relieve the feeling of shame, guilt, and isolation of those dealing with depression and thoughts of suicide

 

What Can You Do?  

  • Call, Text, or Visit: For many people in distress, lending a calm, empathic ear can make all the difference.  
  • Ask Questions: Do not hesitate to seek clarification and ask for specifics when you have concerns. Ask the question: “Are you thinking about killing yourself?”  
  • Get Help: Know the resources available. If a farmer shows signs of a serious or unremitting problem and/or admits to you that they have suicidal ideation urge them to seek professional help.  

Normal life issues can be heightened by the unique experiences of those who are serving and have served in military services. Those who have carried the burden to protect this country in many places all over the world face many mental health challenges. That is why during the month of September we emphasizing all who work with and/or know a service member, veteran, or someone in their family to “check in.”

Here are some points in a veteran or service member’s life when they can feel especially alone, agitated, or anxious: 

  • Around times of deployment or difficulty readjusting following deployment 
  • Loss of a family member, friend, or fellow service member 
  • Career setbacks or disciplinary actions 
  • Difficulty in a marriage or family life 
  • Transitioning from military to civilian life 
  • Financial difficulty 
  • Major life changes

 

Why Check in? Everyone has a role to play in suicide prevention.  

  • Your “check in” may create a positive connection needed to help reduces the risk of suicidal behavior  
  • Your “check in” may help reduce the stigma and be the support needed for them to seek mental health services  
  • Your “check in” may help relieve the feeling of shame, guilt, and isolation of those dealing with depression and  thoughts of suicide 

 

What Can You Do?  

  • Call, Text, or Visit: For many people in distress, lending a calm, empathic ear can make all the difference  
  • Ask Questions: Do not hesitate to seek clarification and ask for specifics when you have concerns. Ask the question: “Are you thinking about killing yourself?”  
  • Get Help: Know the resources available 
  • Specialized Resources
  • General Resources

Gamers (people who play video games) 

Gamer and Online Harassment Hotline
https://gameshotline.org 

Gamers in Distress
https://www.activeminds.org/wpcontent/uploads/2020/03/ActiveMinds_LCS_GamerInDistress.pdf 

Farmers (people who farm or produce)

Kansas Ag Stress Resources
https://www.kansasagstress.org  

Farmers Crisis Center
https://farmcrisis.nfu.org 

Farm Aid
https://www.farmaid.org/our-work/resources-for-farmers/farmer-resource-guides/crisis-support-farm-aid-resource-guide/  

Farmer Veteran Coalition for Farmers who are Veterans
https://farmvetco.org 

Rural Health Information Hub – Kansas Resources
https://www.ruralhealthinfo.org/states/kansas/resources

Service Members, Veterans & Families (SMVF)

Chat Online at VeteransCrisisLine.net/Chat
https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/get-help/chat  

Live Connected Kansas
https://kansaspreventioncollaborative.org/liveconnectedks/ 

Make The Connection
www.maketheconnection.net 

Suicide Prevention Lifeline
https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/help-yourself/veterans/

If you or someone you know is in crisis:

Call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255

Nacional de Prevención del Suicidio: 1-888-628-9454